Pearl Grovenstein - Mobile Memorial Gardens

Pearl Grovenstein

July 11, 2016

Condolences For 
"Pearl Grovenstein"

  1. I remember Pearl as a very kind, gentle, humble and faithful woman. She always smiled. She did a great job organizing weddings at St. Paul's Lutheran Church. And her husband, Johnnie, made lots of visits with me to the home-bound members. He taught me much about stewardship. Together, Johnnie and Pearl, were great examples of the Christian faith. I miss both of them. Rest eternal grant them, O Lord, and let light perpetual shine upon them.

    Rev. Gary Schimmer, Pastor at St. Paul's Lutheran Church, 1990-1998

  2. Pearl Grovenstein was a longtime, faithful worker in the Lutheran Church. In 1965, through her efforts as President of the United Lutheran Church Women (ULCW) at St. Paul's Lutheran Church, the first "Chrismon Tree" in Mobile was seen in the nave of St. Paul's Lutheran Church, then located at 1801 Government Street. Quoting from the newspaper article announcing the "Open House" for the public at St. Paul's, "Instead of the usual tinsel, bright colored balls, etc., the tree is decorated with more than 100 'Chrismons' and over 200 tiny white lights. Chrismons are Christ monograms. They are copies of symbols used by early Christians to identify themselves, to designate places of worship and to express their faith..." Pearl obtained lists of needed supplies and instructions from women at The Lutheran Church of the Ascension in Danville, Virginia, owner of the copyright and the home church of member Mrs. Harry W. Spencer, originator of the concept. The predecessor of the ULCW was the Women's Missionary Society, in which, as a member, Pearl had received a Life Membership award. The Lutheran Church Women (LCW) followed the ULCW, and the LCW was followed by Women of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (WELCA). Pearl was a faithful supporter of each one of these organizations. This may be considered a trivial thought, but when I think of you, Pearl, I will remember you in that smart brown suit, that I thought looked so good on you. Now, rest in peace with the Lord, dear Pearl.
    Lilly Olsen.

  3. Pearl Grovenstein was a longtime, faithful worker in the Lutheran Church. In 1965, as President of the United Lutheran Church Women of St. Paul's Lutheran Church, her efforts led to the first Chrismon-decorated Christmas tree in Mobile being seen in the nave of St. Paul's Lutheran Church, then located at 1801 Government Street. Quoting from the newspaper article announcing the "Open House" for the public at St. Paul's, "Instead of the usual tinsel, bright-colored balls, etc., the tree is decorated with over 100 'Chrismons' and over 200 tiny white lights. Chrismons are Christ monograms. They are copies of symbols used by early Christians to identify themselves, to designate places of worship and to express their faith..." Pearl obtained lists of needed supplies and instructions from women at The Lutheran Church of the Ascension in Danville, Virginia, owner of the copyright and home church of member Mrs. Harry W. Spencer, originator of the concept. Predecessor of the United Lutheran Church Women (ULCW) was the Women's Missionary Society, where, as a member, Pearl had received a Life Membership award. Following the United Lutheran Church Women (ULCW) was the Lutheran Church Women (LCW), which was followed by the current organization, the Women of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (WELCA). Pearl was a faithful supporter of each one of these groups. This may seem to be a trivial thought, but, when I think about you, Pearl, I will see you in that smart brown suit that I thought looked so good on you. Now, rest in peace with the Lord, dear Pearl.
    Lilly Olsen.

  4. Pearl Grovenstein was a longtime, faithful worker in the Lutheran Church. In 1965, as President of the United Lutheran Church Women of St. Paul's Lutheran Church, her efforts led to the first Chrismon-decorated Christmas tree in Mobile being seen in the nave of St. Paul's Lutheran Church, then located at 1801 Government Street. Quoting from the newspaper article announcing the "Open House" for the public at St. Paul's, "Instead of the usual tinsel, bright-colored balls, etc., the tree is decorated with over 100 'Chrismons' and over 200 tiny white lights. Chrismons are Christ monograms. They are copies of symbols used by early Christians to identify themselves, to designate places of worship and to express their faith..." Pearl obtained lists of needed supplies and instructions from women at The Lutheran Church of the Ascension in Danville, Virginia, owner of the copyright and home church of member Mrs. Harry W. Spencer, originator of the concept. Predecessor of the United Lutheran Church Women (ULCW) was the Women's Missionary Society, where, as a member, Pearl had received a Life Membership award. Following the United Lutheran Church Women (ULCW) was the Lutheran Church Women (LCW), which was followed by the current organization, the Women of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (WELCA). Pearl was a faithful supporter of each one of these groups. This may seem to be a trivial thought, but, when I think about you, Pearl, I will see you in that smart brown suit that I thought looked so good on you. Now, rest in peace with the Lord, dear Pearl.
    Lilly Olsen.

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